Published October 30, 2018

Learn How To Do a Dumbbell Snatch from the Pros

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Each month, we're featuring a different movement that you'll often see (and do!) in one of our HIIT classes here at Fhitting Room. Learn from the pros and Master Our Movements, as our certified trainers break down some of our most popular exercises step-by-step. This month, we're featuring the dumbbell snatch.

The dumbbell snatch, when performed correctly, works the quads and trap muscles. Because this movement works one side of your body at a time, your core muscles are forced to compensate for the uneven weight distribution to keep your body upright. Plus, performing a unilateral movement like the dumbbell snatch forces your non-dominant side to grow stronger. This exercise and the burst of power required to execute works to increase overall power and speed.

Below, Fhitting Room trainers Riley + Ben show us how to properly do a dumbbell snatch. When performed incorrectly, there's a high risk for back injury, so we called in the pros to show us how it's done: 

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At the start of the move, it's important to begin with your hips down and your chest pulled up in order to protect your lower back. The dumbbell should rest between the arches of your feet at the start of the movement in order to create a clear path of travel for the bell. Be sure to keep a neutral chin (don't crane your neck!) and keep your eyes on the bell.

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Here, Ben shows us what not to do at the start of the movement. Your hips shouldn't be high and the dumbbell should never be out in front of your toes. This could lead to lower back injury. 

Protect your neck! Make sure you don't crane your head up. Instead, keep a neutral neck with your eyes on the dumbbell.

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Notice how Ben does the snatch in real time. He's using power from his legs to drive the movement, leading the dumbbell up with his elbow. He keeps the dumbbell tight to his body throughout the movement, not letting it sway in front of or behind him. He traces the midline of his body throughout the entire movement, ending with the bell overhead and his shoulder next to his ear.

Perfect your form! Take class with Ben + Riley Fridays at Fhitting Room's Upper East Side studio.  

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